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Friday, March 9, 2012

Mini-Lessons from Friday, Mar. 9, 2012

These Mini-Lessons are posted on Twitter, and in China on Weibo, throughout the day. You can follow them there!

To get the most from them, you should try to use them in sentences, or discuss them with friends. Writing something on Twitter or Weibo is a great way to practice!
  • Tip: Define new words in your own words. Don't translate; learn to explain words and give examples in English.
  • Proverb: Don't cry over spilled milk: You can't change the past. Once milk is spilled, you cannot drink it. Just clean it up and go on!
  • Academic Vocabulary: rely (on): depend on, need, trust. "I rely on my dictionary too much." "His reliance on his wife's help was touching."
  • Literature: Loch Ness Monster: a big animal, probably not real, said to live in Loch Ness in Scotland. Looked for by many, but never proven.
  • Art: The Louvre: the world's most-visited art museum, and one of the largest; in Paris, France. Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" is there.
  • Slang: Tell me about it!: "I know what you mean!" A: "I can't believe how hot it is outside!." B: "Tell me about it!"
  • Geography: Amazon River: world's 2nd longest river. World's largest drainage area, including parts of Peru, Colombia, Brazil.

NOTES:
  1. Academic Vocabulary is the Academic Word List from Oxford University Press. This is "a list of words that you are likely to meet if you study at an English-speaking university."
  2. The Proverb, and the Literature, Art, and Geography words are from lists in the Dictionary of Cultural Literacy. I wrote the definitions and examples myself.
  3. The Tip and Slang words are from my own lists, and I wrote the definitions and examples myself.

This lesson is ©2012 by James Baquet. You may share this work freely. Teachers may use it in the classroom, as long as students are told the source (URL). You may not publish this material or sell it. Please write to me if you have any questions about "fair use."

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