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Saturday, March 3, 2012

Mini-Lessons from Saturday, Mar. 3, 2012

These Mini-Lessons are posted on Twitter, and in China on Weibo, throughout the day. You can follow them there!

To get the most from them, you should try to use them in sentences, or discuss them with friends. Writing something on Twitter or Weibo is a great way to practice!
  • Tip: Keep an English notebook. Write new vocabulary; practice sentences; make a note of questions to be answered.
  • Proverb: Here today, gone tomorrow: Nothing lasts forever. Things you have now ("today") may not be yours later ("tomorrow").
  • Academic Vocabulary: considerable: large, big. "There is a considerable link between smoking and cancer." "His car was considerably cheaper than mine."
  • Literature: Camelot: Castle in King Arthur stories where Arthur and his followers lived. Washington D.C. was called this in John Kennedy's time.
  • Art: a cappella: meaning "as in a church," a style of singing without musical instruments. These days doesn't have to be religious.
  • Slang: double-check: check a second time to be sure. "Please double-check that you have the plane tickets and your passport."
  • Geography: Deep South: several southern US states which had farming-based economies before American Civil War.

NOTES:
  1. Academic Vocabulary is the Academic Word List from Oxford University Press. This is "a list of words that you are likely to meet if you study at an English-speaking university."
  2. The Proverb, and the Literature, Art, and Geography words are from lists in the Dictionary of Cultural Literacy. I wrote the definitions and examples myself.
  3. The Tip and Slang words are from my own lists, and I wrote the definitions and examples myself.

This lesson is ©2012 by James Baquet. You may share this work freely. Teachers may use it in the classroom, as long as students are told the source (URL). You may not publish this material or sell it. Please write to me if you have any questions about "fair use."

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