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Sunday, May 20, 2012

Mini-Lessons from Sunday, May 20, 2012

These Mini-Lessons are posted on Twitter, and in China on Weibo, throughout the day. You can follow them there!

To get the most from them, you should try to use them in sentences, or discuss them with friends. Writing something on Twitter or Weibo is a great way to practice!
  • Tip: Make your own mnemonics. Learn ways to remember new words, lists, etc. "Go, went, gone" isn't enough. Make associations!
  • Proverb: Familiarity breeds contempt: When we get too close to someone or something, we lose respect for it.
  • Academic Vocabulary: minimum: the smallest amount possible. Also "minimize" (make as small as possible) and "minimal" (adj.)
  • Literature: Groundhog Day: Feb. 2 US holiday (not a day off) when legend says a groundhog (a rodent) wakes up from his winter's sleep.
  • Art: genius: once, a spirit that inspired artists and others. Now, a very intelligent person. Once "He HAS a genius"; now "He IS a genius."
  • Slang: to wash up: clean up before dinner. "Kids! Dinner's ready! Come in and wash up!" Also, to do the dishes after dinner.
  • Geography: Mid-Atlantic states: a description of the US region containing New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland.

NOTES:
  1. Academic Vocabulary is the Academic Word List from Oxford University Press. This is "a list of words that you are likely to meet if you study at an English-speaking university."
  2. The Proverb, and the Literature, Art, and Geography words are from lists in the Dictionary of Cultural Literacy. I wrote the definitions and examples myself.
  3. The Tip and Slang words are from my own lists, and I wrote the definitions and examples myself.

This lesson is ©2012 by James Baquet. You may share this work freely. Teachers may use it in the classroom, as long as students are told the source (URL). You may not publish this material or sell it. Please write to me if you have any questions about "fair use."

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