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Thursday, May 17, 2012

Mini-Lessons from Thursday, May 17, 2012

These Mini-Lessons are posted on Twitter, and in China on Weibo, throughout the day. You can follow them there!

To get the most from them, you should try to use them in sentences, or discuss them with friends. Writing something on Twitter or Weibo is a great way to practice!
  • Tip: Consider culture. Language without culture is just a "secret code," like -•-• --- -•• •. When connected to culture, it comes alive!
  • Proverb: Too many cooks spoil the broth: A plan must be specific and carried out by a few. When too many get involved, the work slows down.
  • Academic Vocabulary: flexible: able to change in new situations. "The best employees show flexibility in times of trouble."
  • Literature: Trojan War: Greeks fought Troy for 10 years. The setting for Homer's "The Iliad"; "The Odyssey" is the story of a general coming home.
  • Art: Edgar Degas: (1834-1917) French painter and sculptor, best known for delicate images of ballet dancers.
  • Slang: to tell someone what's what: explain when someone has done wrong. "If Joe's sales don't improve, I'll have to tell him what's what."
  • Geography: atlas: a book of maps. In Greek myth, Atlas was a Titan who held the world on his shoulders, so now a book that "holds the world."

NOTES:
  1. Academic Vocabulary is the Academic Word List from Oxford University Press. This is "a list of words that you are likely to meet if you study at an English-speaking university."
  2. The Proverb, and the Literature, Art, and Geography words are from lists in the Dictionary of Cultural Literacy. I wrote the definitions and examples myself.
  3. The Tip and Slang words are from my own lists, and I wrote the definitions and examples myself.

This lesson is ©2012 by James Baquet. You may share this work freely. Teachers may use it in the classroom, as long as students are told the source (URL). You may not publish this material or sell it. Please write to me if you have any questions about "fair use."

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